Listen To Your Heart: Feed It Bacon

This morning, you might have had an egg white omelet cooked in canola oil with two pieces of whole wheat toast, lightly ‘buttered’ with margarine.

I had a lard-greased pan of bacon and eggs.

Who had the healthier breakfast? The answer might surprise you!
butter
Behold: a brief history of saturated fat, cholesterol, and heart disease (and how rabbits are not humans).
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Don’t Fall Into the Trap: 10 Tricks Food Marketers Use to Make You Buy More

This article first appeared last week as a guest blog post for the amazing WellnessFX team. Thank you for having me, guys!

When it comes to healthy eating, it is all too common to rely on packaging, marketing, and the media to tell us what to eat. Making decisions based on colors, pseudo health statements, and nutritional labels can render grocery shopping confusing and potentially harmful. If you don’t shop exclusively for all of your products at a farmer’s market, chances are you navigate aisles of plastic-wrapped “food products.” Here are 10 techniques food marketers use to convince you to buy more. Be on the lookout for them to avoid getting fooled!

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Correlation Is Not Causation: Let Them Eat Meat!

In the first pages of The China Study (aka the ‘vegan bible’ which blames the rise of chronic diseases on animal protein consumption), Dr. Colin Campbell presents the following graph:

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What do we see? An almost perfect correlation between daily meat consumption and colon cancer incidence in women. The countries in which people eat the most meat have the highest incidence of the disease. Therefore, if we want to avoid colon cancer, we should eat less meat.

Simple?

Not so fast.
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The USDA: In Bed with Breakfast Cereal

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is responsible for publishing Dietary Guidelines for Americans every 5 years. These serve as the basis for school lunch programs, nutritional recommendations in hospitals, and are held as the social norm for what is considered healthy eating. You can find the previous USDA reports (1995 to 2005) here, and the current 2010 one here.

If the guidelines had our best interest at heart, they would reflect the latest nutritional research and objectively inform us of the best possible diet to fend off chronic disease and reverse the rise of metabolic syndrome.
Unfortunately, that’s not entirely the case. The guidelines are more a reflection of political forces and a tool to market US-made food products rather than a guide to better the health of Americans. Following on last week’s article, I’d like to look at the long-standing relationship between the USDA and processed food manufacturers.

Case in point: the ready-to-eat breakfast cereal industry.

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